card making :: waterbrush + ink pads

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Watercolor painting can be applied to card making projects in a bunch of different ways.  To make a beautiful card like this, I’m going to tell you how to use an ink pad and my new favorite tool – the waterbrush – to achieve stunning cards in a small amount of time.  Not only do you achieve a uniquely created image, but the technique itself can be quite meditative and soothing too.

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First, let me tell you about this waterbrush.  I love it.  It makes it so much easier than having a small bucket of water on the table where our little toddler could possibly knock it over, therefore much less time is spent cleaning a brush in between colors.  It’s a great tool to have if you’re traveling because of its water barrel, plus waterbrushes come in a couple of different brush sizes and tips.

And then let’s just take a minute to talk about using an ink pad for watercolor painting.  I mean, why didn’t I think of that sooner?  I have all of these great ink pads in awesome colors but didn’t really ever think of using them in this way.  For this particular project I used Stampin’ Up! water-soluble ink pads because I like their built-in lid feature which makes it so easy to pull a little bit of ink from it.  (For a really great tutorial about this technique, check out this YouTube video.)

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I started by cutting some watercolor paper into 3.75″ squares and then stamping the image I wanted to color in with a black Staz On ink pad.  Staz On ink pads are great for watercolor painting because they won’t smear or bleed.  I let them dry for a minute and then went to town with the waterbrush and ink pads, filling in each of the petals and leaves.  (Again, this can be a peaceful project … especially while little ones nap!)

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What I love about working with a stamped image such as flowers is that you can come up with so many color palettes and possibilities.  To complete the card I trimmed the watercolor paper down to 3.5″ to center the flower wreath image.  I made the card base out of cardstock that was cut into a 4″ x 8″ rectangle and then folded in half.  I matted the watercolor paper on a piece of cardstock that was cut to 3-5/8″ square, and then adhered it all to the card base.

To make the sentiment, I die cut the words out of metallic gold paper and adhered them with mini glue dots that I rolled into skinny logs.  I love how the metallic paper adds just enough pizzazz to the already beautiful flowers.

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A waterbrush is also an inexpensive tool to add to your crafting tool kit when you already have so many ink pads and don’t want to fuss with buying a tray of watercolor paint.  They are sold in craft stores but are generally not located in the watercolor paint section.  Instead they are usually in the mixed media section near the rubber stamps and ink pads.  And if you can score one of the numerous coupons those stores tend to send out (or access through their websites) then you can generally save 40 to 55% off of one.

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And here is a great YouTube video demonstrating how to get started with using a waterbrush.

Have fun with this and be crafty!

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Products Used:

– Stampin’ Up! “Timeless Love” clear mount stamp set (item #139408)
Stampin’ Up! stamp pads in “Tangelo Twist” (#133646), “Hello Honey” (#133643), “Blackberry Bliss” (#133642), and “Mossy Meadow” (#133645)
Niji waterbrush with small sized tip
Staz On “Jet Black” ink pad
 Stampin’ Up! cardstock paper in “Mossy Meadow” (#133676), “Hello Honey” (#133648), and “Blackberry Bliss” (#133675)
Stampin’ Up! gold foil sheet (#132622)
Stampin’ Up! Greetings Thinlits Dies (#138275)
mini glue dots

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